Last edited by Akinotaxe
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Variability in Poa pratensis L. root production. found in the catalog.

Variability in Poa pratensis L. root production.

Arnold Jimmie Hiebert

Variability in Poa pratensis L. root production.

by Arnold Jimmie Hiebert

  • 86 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published in 1970 .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bluegrasses.,
  • Roots (Botany)

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 46 l.
    Number of Pages46
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20841486M

    The genetic control of apomixis was studied in numerous segregating progenies originated from intercrossing and selfing of obligate sexual and facultative apomictic parents in Poa pratensis by means of the flow cytometric seed screen. The data support a novel model with five major genes required to control asexual seed formation: the Apospory initiator (Ait) gene, the Apospory preventer. The spatial distribution of roots of two alien grasses, Bromus tectorum and Poa pratensis, grown singly and in a mixture, was examined using a double-labelling radioisotope technique. Interactions between the root systems of these plants led to a restricted B. tectorum rooting volume in P. pratensis neighborhoods greater than or equal tod-old.

    1. A study was made of the effects of variation in soil temperature, pH, nitrogen nutrition, and clipping height on the development of Poa pratensis plants grown in sand cultures under greenhouse conditions. 2. Plants grown at temperatures of 15⚬, 25⚬, and 35⚬ C. produced at 15⚬ C. a tall, succulent, bushy top growth with many leaves and at 35⚬ C. an erect, non-succulent, short top. Development of turf-type Poa pratensis l. germplasm for seed production without field burning. Athens Journal of Sciences. 2(1) New records of Lasiodiplodia theobromae in seeds of Tetrapleura tetraptera from Nigeria and fruit of Cocos nucifera from Mexico - (Peer Reviewed Journal).

    Poa pratensis var. transnominata, Poa pratensis var. urjandhaica, Poa pubescens, Poa urjanchaica, Poa Seeds and Plant Production Seeds are sown in springtime in a cold frame containing moist compost. Seedlings are thinned to Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources. The performed investigations comprised eight ecotypes of Poa pratensis L. derived from different parts of Poland: Bieszczady, Beskidy, Podhale and Lubuskie Voivodeship. The following isoenzymes were determined in the collected plant material: acid phosphatase (ACP), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), diaphorase (DIA), peroxidase (PX), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), esterase (EST), fluorescent .


Share this book
You might also like
Financial times.

Financial times.

Ethnic embroidery

Ethnic embroidery

Jane Walkers Book of lip reading practice material.

Jane Walkers Book of lip reading practice material.

Select historical documents of the Middle Ages

Select historical documents of the Middle Ages

Ancient Peruvian myths

Ancient Peruvian myths

Estimating one-factor models of short-term interest rates

Estimating one-factor models of short-term interest rates

Blériot anniversary race

Blériot anniversary race

Yahweh as the bringer of Evil on Judah in the book of Jeremiah

Yahweh as the bringer of Evil on Judah in the book of Jeremiah

Wills and estate planning handbook for Oregon

Wills and estate planning handbook for Oregon

Electromechanical dynamics

Electromechanical dynamics

Journal

Journal

W.D. Howells, traveler from Altruria, 1889-1894.

W.D. Howells, traveler from Altruria, 1889-1894.

Spy Vs Spy

Spy Vs Spy

Variability in Poa pratensis L. root production by Arnold Jimmie Hiebert Download PDF EPUB FB2

Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) is a sod-forming grass. It is widely grown as a pasture in many cool-season regions of North America. Kentucky bluegrass is well adapted to less-managed pastures with low animal Variability in Poa pratensis L. root production. book rates (Fig.

) (Table ). Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) received one annual cut, twice yearly forage harvest, and mown turf treatments.

Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) received one or two yearly cutting treatments. Soil cores were collected to a cm depth and divided into two cm by: 1. Poa pratensis, commonly known as Kentucky bluegrass (or blue grass), smooth meadow-grass, or common meadow-grass, is a perennial species of grass native to practically all of Europe, North Asia and the mountains of Algeria and Morocco.

Although the species is spread over all of the cool, humid parts of the United States, it is not native to North : Poaceae. The present study quantifies belowground morphological traits of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and establishes their relationships with nitrate uptake rate (NUR).

Tiller‐generated plants were grown in silica sand, mowed weekly, and watered daily with nutrient solution containing 1 m M nitrate for 5 by: Synopsis Root weight increased significantly during periods of low temperature. The pattern of root development was modified by nitrogen applications. Journal of Production Agriculture (–) Soil Horizons (–) Field, Lab, Earth Podcast Winter Root Activity in Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) 1.

Hanson. Search Cited by: The spindle fibre attachment for the chromosomes in the various species ideograms was found to be regularly median or chromosome variability and the mode of seed production were examined in Poa pratensis L., using selected, uniform strains, indigenous plants and plants grown from commercial seed.

The somatic chromosome number was. The monitored environmental conditions recorded at the site level and the initial biomass of the individuals explained individual plant growth with variable accuracies (between R m 2 = for P. pratensis and R m 2 = for L. perenne; Table 1).

The spatial distribution of roots of two alien grasses, Bromus tectorum and Poa pratensis, grown singly and in a mixture, was examined using a double—labelling radioisotope technique.

Interactions between the root systems of these plants led to a restricted B. tectorum rooting volume in P. pratensis neighborhoods °30—d—old. The root length distribution in particular root diameter classes is shown in Fig. differences in RLD values between MC and other treatments, described above, were related to changes in RLD values in the root diameter class of – mm in the 0–5 cm and – mm in the 5–10 cm soil layer.

At the depth of 10–15 cm there were. Second generation progeny test of the method of reproduction in Kentucky Bluegrass,Poa pratensis L. — Journ. Amer Soc. Agronomy 35 ; – (). Google Scholar. Introduction. Poa pratensis L., also known as Kentucky bluegrass, is a hardy, persistent, and attractive forage and turf grass species that is well adapted to a wide range of mesic to moist habitats.

It belongs to the Poaceae (subfamily Pooideae, tribe Poacea), a family with more than described species [] and can hybridize with P. secunda, a, P. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) is an important turf and forage grass throughout temperate regions world-wide (Wedin and Huff ).

It reproduces mainly from asexual seed through a complex. Because of the importance of such factors as appearance and vigor in turf management, genetic selection of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) is often conducted at high levels of N application. Kentucky Bluegrass, Poa pratensis L.

Tom Cook Oregon State University Introduction: Kentucky bluegrass has long been the most important cool season grass planted as turf.

It has been used for lawns, athletic fields, golf course fairways, tees, and rough, and been widely planted for pastures in regions where it thrives. Linkage mapping in apomictic and sexual Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) genotypes using a two way pseudo-testcross strategy based on AFLP and SAMPL markers.

Theor. Appl. Genet.– Quarin, C.L. Seasonal changes in the incidence of apomixis of diploid, triploid, and tetraploid plants of Paspalum cromyorrhizon.

1 Effects of root-applied endothall on Poa pratensis, Agrostis palustris and Poa-annua, from top to bottom, 3 weeks after treatment. 37 2 Effects of root-applied endothall on an "annual" type of Poa annuai control plant on the left and treated plant on the right.

52 3 Effects of root-applied endothall on a "perennial" type of Poa annuai control. They do, however, show variation for disease resistance, color, seed-head production, fall color retention and many other traits, so the potential for breeding improved varieties exists.

Recently, The Pennsylvania State University initiated a Poa breeding program aimed at developing commercial sources of greens-type Poa (see photo, bottom of. production over the following growing season.

How-ever, it is not clear to what extent reduced nitrogen uptake over winter decreases grass production, or whether is it merely a symptom of root damage.

We examined the growth response of the grass Poa pratensis L. (Kentucky bluegrass) to variation. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) is a highly adapted and important turfgrass species in cool-season climates.

It has high and variable polyploidy, small and metacentric chromosomes, and a facultative apomictic breeding system. As a result of the polyploidy and apomixis, identifying hybrids for Mendelian selection, identifying fixed apomictic progeny of desirable hybridizations for.

Poa pratensis L., Lolium perenne L. and Festuca valida (Uechtr.) Penzes; the forbs Achillea millefolium L., Plantago lanceolata L. and Taraxacum officinale Weber ex Wigg; and the legume Trifolium repens L. Rooting depth did not explain plant ∆ in this shallow-soil site, where soil moisture was concentrated in the top of the profile.

Similarly, Poa pratensis plants frozen in both the early and late spring had higher biomass than the controls. In contrast, Festuca rubra plants frozen in early spring and fall had lower root biomass than control plants, and Lolium perenne plants that experienced every freeze had lower root biomass than the .P.

pratensis is a grass species from the family Poaceae. It was one of the many species described in Species Plantarum by Carl Linnaeus in Poa is Greek for fodder and pratensis is Latin for meadow. Infraspecific taxa recognised by the Plant List () are Poa pratensis var.

hatusimae (Ohwi) Ohwi, Poa pratensis subsp. latifolia (Weihe ex Mert. & W.D.J. Koch) Schübl.You searched for: Journal Crop science Remove constraint Journal: Crop science Publication Year Remove constraint Publication Year: Source .